Dog Owner Insights


#1

Is there any dog owner from this community? Would you mind telling me your thoughts about electric pet fence? Is this product a good alternative to the traditional wood fence? My dog keeps on roaming around the neighborhood and I am afraid that sooner or later he won’t be able to find his way back home.


#2

I never really liked the idea of shocking a dog to keep him in the yard, nothing I considered for my dogs. A real, physical fence is far superior.


#3

If a traditional, sturdy, constructed fence is a viable option for you, you won’t have to worry about it not working if the power goes out/a squirrel chews through a line.


#4

But then again it is expensive, one of the reasons why I am also considering a wireless fence. Thank you for sharing your insights regarding my concern.


#5

A guild member’s partner worked with trainers to use shock collars. She would use them on the new trainers day 1 so they respect it. It’s going to hurt, but it’s meant to deter the dog from testing it so if they train well the power going out wouldn’t matter. Honestly, I’d see what trainers in your area think after meeting your dog. Consultations are usually quite affordable if not free. Good luck!


#6

I really appreciate all the pointers that you’ve said. Thank you so much for helping me out.


#7

Unless you set up something that shocks the dog when it goes over the fence you aren’t going to be around every time the dog goes over lol so shock collars would be rendered useless unless you opt for more expensive “invisible shock fence”. I’d suggest looking into a proper tether set up, and by proper I mean a proper length, set up, with adequate shelter if you are able to tether in your area. A friend of mine shows and competes with her APBT in sporting events and the dogs by genetic default are DA, she uses tether spots when they aren’t being interacted with and she’s yet to have an issue. Meanwhile if she didn’t she’d have dead dogs, AC on her ■■■■ and well wall scaling canines.


#8

We are lucky because we already have a nice fence in our backyard. One dog liked to dig (the German shepherd) and the other liked to try to wiggle between gaps (toy poodle) and we added an invisible electric fence to cover the back yard. In a month, both dogs learned the backyard boundaries (they really weren’t a big problem before, but they did get out once or twice and with children, it’s a danger to the dogs if they get in the street ). So we sometimes do and sometimes don’t put on the fence collars when they go out into the back yard.

Honestly, we have enough stuff in our backyard to keep the most ADHD dog distracted, raised gardens, pet safe plants, pool, and shade. That doesn’t prevent the distraction of “Squirrel”, or “Lizard”, or “Snake” but they seem to be pretty happy and behaved. And we take them to the local dog park and let them socialize and stretch their legs with other dogs.

I don’t know if I have helped, but I can say, that the invisible fence does give us a piece of mind and has made our dogs aware of boundaries other than the big-white-board-thing that goes around the back yard.

K