How do I change the default save location of my screenshots?

question

#1

Hi.

I have SWL installed on my SSD boot drive, and I would like to change the location my screenshots get saved to to be somewhere in my much larger HD (D:) instead.

Where can I change the path? Is it a line in one of the .XMLs somewhere? Or a setting I haven’t noticed in-game itself? I tried poking around for it last night, and found the clothing rules XML as opposed to the one mentioned previously to someone fixing their RDB data.

I’ve wanted to change the default save location from the beginning, but now with my SSD dangerously full (and I don’t know how, which worries me the most! - since SWL is still merely 37GBs of the 225GB drive… Windows 10 started at somewhere between 65 and 86GBs… and I haven’t installed anything else…)… every bit of space I can save I feel is crucial until I figure out what’s hogging half my drive!

Thank you kindly for your assistance.


#2

Ooh…good question. I have the same situation. (And will hope you get a great answer I can use too!)


#3

If you’re using the Steam client, you can change them in Steam setting -> In Game -> Screenshot folder.

As an alternative, if you are using the Windows screenshot to onedrive functionality, as long as your onedrive folder is on the drive you want them saved, they’ll save there when you press printscreen


#4

I guess you can try to move the screenshots folder away to a different drive (let’s assume d: ) and then make a symbolic link.
Open a shell - Window-R, “cmd” - navigate to your SWL installation directory, then do

mklink /d screenshots d:\screenshots

(It is entirely possible you need to run the shell as adminstrator, not sure)


#5

Hello EnigmaticPyro. Unfortunately, SWL doesn’t have a built-in option for changing the screenshot folder’s path. I’ll be happy to forward your interest in this feature to the devs as feedback, though.


#6

SSD performance suffers a lot when the drive gets close to full, so you should really identify the space hogs instead of moving relatively small stuff like screenshot folders.

I suggest you start by running Windows 10’s built-in Disk Cleanup, using the “clean up system files” option to remove space hogs such as old Windows Update files and especially previous Windows installations. This alone can easily save you tens of gigabytes if you’re on an older install and have never cleaned up between major Windows updates.

After that, use a tool like TreeSizeFree to identify anything else that might be a candidate for cleanup. Fallout and Skyrim saves can take up a surprising amount of space, for example.